Inman Masonic Lodge George Washington Portrait Presentation

 The members of Inman Masonic Lodge pose with the portrait presented by Brothers Ken and Gene Kuszmaul.

The members of Inman Masonic Lodge pose with the portrait presented by Brothers Ken and Gene Kuszmaul.

At the August Regular Communication of Inman Masonic Lodge, Brothers Ken and Gene Kuszmaul presented WB Stephen Pinker and the Brethren with a George Washington portrait.  The inscription on the plaque at the bottom of the portrait reads, “The blessings of each day are cemented in the Brotherly Love of Inman Masonic Lodge #201 AFM.  We will forever be grateful, Ken and Gene Kuszmaul, 2017.”  During a trip with RWB Sam Turner III and WB Bryan Megonigal to Charleston, SC, he discovered that many of the Lodges in the low country were buying portraits, one per Lodge, for the schools in the area.  Brother Gene had the idea of buying one for Inman Lodge.  Ironically, Brother Ken had came up with the same idea, without any prior discussion between them.  He and his Uncle Ken decided to purchase a portrait for Inman in the hopes that it, with the inspirational message inscribed on it, would serve as a beacon to the Brotherhood of Inman.  But, the portrait serves a two-fold purpose. 

The George Washington Portrait Project is helmed by RWB Sam Turner III of Roebuck Lodge #357 AFM, and RWB John King of Cross Hill Lodge #159 AFM.  The proceeds of the portrait project go toward Juvenile Diabetes Research, which Brother Ken Kuszmaul is all too familiar with.  When she was three, Ken’s daughter Bridget was diagnosed with juvenile diabetes.  He had to witness his daughter who, at the time, had to be stuck with needles five times a day to get her glucose readings as her own body had no way of producing it on her own.  Now at the age of 43, she has suffered many hardships battling her disease.  In 2014, Bridget had a brain bleed as a complication of diabetes, and during her rehabilitation contracted cerebral meningitis as well as a staph infection.  Although she recovered, she now has diminished eyesight as a result of diabetes.  His granddaughter, Katlyn was also diagnosed with juvenile diabetes at the age of one.  Now eighteen, she has enjoyed a normal life due to the advances in treatment that research into this disease has brought.  With Ken’s brother’s and Gene's Uncle's death as a result of this dreaded disease in 2016, as well as with his daughter’s and granddaughter’s battles, it was only natural to contribute to such a noble purpose while presenting a small token to the Brotherhood.